Free Tips on Buying a Home for Sale


Worst Time Of The Year May Be The Best For Buyers

Why is the worst time of the year, often the best time for real estate buyers?

The holiday season and the following “worst weather” months are widely considered the worst time of the year for selling or buying real estate. In reality, these distraction-packed months – November to February – carry benefits for determined buyers.

    • Join the “herd” of buyers who are active during traditional “good weather” home shopping months – starting with the spring frenzy of home buying – and this competition for properties can mean buyers pay more, lose out on good-value listings, and receive less attention from swamped real estate and mortgage professionals.
    • Get outside the traditional “box” of right times to buy and you’ll deal with sellers who are very committed to selling, real estate and mortgage professionals able to give you their full attention, and less competition for good-value listings. The key advantage of shopping for a home during “the worst times” is that sellers who have listed their property during these periods are serious, often very serious, about selling. Motivated sellers understand why they benefit from taking offers to purchase seriously and take the time to explore how they may be able to work with the buyers. As we’ve discussed before, it’s about a lot more than purchase price. For instance, offering to match the seller’s perfect closing date can carry considerable value for the seller just as not asking for a huge shopping list of inclusions means savings for sellers.
    • There’s a practical side, too. Viewing property at “the worst time” can tell you a lot about what you can really expect from a property:Visit a house during a hard rain and you’ll see how well the eavestrough system does its job. No overflowing gutters, waterfalls at corners, or soaked exterior walls. There should not be exterior water damage or water in the basement (at least from that source). Observe how the rain water flows off the land. Does it collect around the house or move to the street?  Pooling may indicate a potential basement problem. The longer water problems from poor maintenance continue, the greater the cost of repairing the damage. Paint may camouflage the trouble, but the problem will persist.
    • Drive by houses after a fresh snowfall and you’ll discover which are well insulated (snow on roof) and which are losing heat (melted snow).
    • Tour a house on a very windy day and drafts, insufficient insulation, and poorly-sealed windows and doors will be revealed.
    • Spend time in a house on a cold day and study how well the furnace heats the whole house. When a furnace is replaced, the duct work is not always adapted. Is it noticeably colder in the back rooms? How’s the second floor and the bathrooms?
    • During the holiday season when parties and cooking are popular pastimes tour condominium units and you’ll see how far noise and smells travel in the building and into the suite or townhome you’re considering.

Are you ready to turn “the worst times for,  home buying” into the best time for your successful real estate transaction?  Call Michele Hanigan at 214-738-5555 or email DallasHomes@me.com when looking for houses for sale in Dallas, or if  you want to see your home.

 

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Free Tips on Selling a Home for Sale


This is a great article for those who are trying to sell a home in Dallas, Texas.  There are a lot of homes for sale, so why not give your an edge?

Use Color Pops in Your Listings to Enhance, Not Distract

By Melissa Dittmann Tracey, REALTOR(R) Magazine

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Is your listing suffering from the neutral blahs? It’s good to go neutral when selling a home so that you offer up potential buyers a blank canvas to imagine their own decorating, but too neutral can also make your listing look dull and forgettable.

Using pops of color throughout the home’s interior can add more visual interest to rooms and even be used to enhance architectural details or create focal points that you want to make sure home buyers don’t miss.

Here are some ideas:

Want to be trendy? Reach for the blues — deep and dark blues are a popular color nowadays to decorate home interiors. But you likely won’t want to go overboard with such a dark tone. “There are lots of blues coming in to interiors that coordinate with turquoise and aqua blues,” says color expert Erika Woelfel, director of color marketing for Behr. “Really deep and dark tone blues like sapphire, iris blue, and navy blue are popular.”

Try coordinating the trendy blues with yellow or lime green — “a great contrasting color can be a nice enhancement with a dark blue,” Woelfel says. If you don’t want to paint an entire room a deep blue color, use it as a color for an accent or feature wall. “Paired with white furniture, blue walls can really pop and create a nice, relaxed atmosphere,” Woelfel says.

Color block: Color blocking has become a popular fashion trend, and you can also use the idea to dress up your interiors. For more modern spaces, you could use color and geometry to give a neutral backdrop more visual interest. For example, the photo to the left shows an example of how color blocking is used to dress up a modern kitchen with neutral gray walls. In this example, the cabinets were painted blue and then colors of dark plum were added to create depth in the space as well as a light cognac brown to soften up the hues.

Create a focal point: This is where accent or feature walls — painting one wall in a room a few shades darker or a more bold color — can really do the trick in leading buyers’ eyes to a place you don’t want them to miss. Feature walls can help you create a focal point in a room, such as in highlighting a fireplace or directing buyers to a hallway. Have some fun with your accent color: You could pick a trendy color here because it’s easy enough for someone to change and it won’t distract from the overall neutral tones of the home.

Accessorize: You don’t have to commit to paint to add color punches. For example, in an all-white kitchen, add color pops through the accessories, like a red or orange colored small appliance, or a bowl of red apples or lemons. For a neutral living room, use color pops through the throw pillows, blankets, or the artwork to weave in color and more visual interest.

Make more room: Reach for a darker tone to make a space feel roomier. Blues and greens may be a good choice, but you’ll need good lighting if you’ll be using darker tones.

For example, used with good lighting, “blue actually can make a space feel larger,” Woelfel says. “Blue is a recessive color. It can fade away in your field of vision. It’s a cool tone that can be used to push out a room and to create a feeling of space, but you have to have good lighting.”

On the other hand, warmer colors — like reds, oranges, and yellows — are a color that move toward you in your vision. “They can make your walls feel closer, but it also can depend on the tone,” she notes.

If you need help buying or selling a home please contact Michele Hanigan at DallasHomes@me.com or call/text 214-738-5555.  Additionally, you can check out Park Cities / Dallas Real Estate Services.

MICHELE HANIGAN, Realtor
Mobile: 214.738.5555

DallasHomes@me.com

http://www.DallasHomesForSaleAndLease.com

6 Creative Free Tips to Afford a Home


6 Creative Free Tips to Afford a Home
1. Investigate local, state, and national down payment assistance programs. These programs give qualified applicants loans or grants to cover all or part of your required down payment. National programs include the Nehemiah program, www.getdownpayment.com, and the American Dream Down Payment Fund from the Department of Housing and Urban Development, www.hud.gov.
2. Explore seller financing. In some cases, sellers may be willing to finance all or part of the purchase price of the home and let you repay them gradually, just as you would do with a mortgage.

3. Consider a shared-appreciation or shared-equity arrangement. Under this arrangement, your family, friends, or even a third-party may buy a portion of the home and share in any appreciation when the home is sold. The owner/occupant usually pays the mortgage, property taxes, and maintenance costs, but all the investors’ names are usually on the mortgage. Companies are available that can help you find such an investor, if your family can’t participate.

4. Ask your family for help. Perhaps a family member will loan you money for the down payment or act as a co-signer for the mortgage. Lenders often like to have a co-signer if you have little credit history.

5. Lease with the option to buy. Renting the home for a year or more will give you the chance to save more toward your down payment. And in many cases, owners will apply some of the rental amount toward the purchase price. You usually have to pay a small, nonrefundable option fee to the owner.

6. Consider a short-term second mortgage. If you can qualify for a short-term second mortgage, this would give you money to make a larger down payment. This may be possible if you’re in good financial standing, with a strong income and little other debt.

For a free MLS home search visit Dallas Homes For Sale and Lease.

Source: Realtor Magazine

MICHELE HANIGAN
Mobile: 214.738.5555

DallasHomes@me.com

http://www.DallasHomesForSaleAndLease.com